Dogs may use Earth’s magnetic field to take shortcuts

Video cameras and GPS allowed researchers to track the navigation of hunting dogs, such as this wire-haired miniature dachshund named Hurvinek Valentinka.
 
KATEŘINA BENEDIKTOVÁ AND HYNEK BURDA

By Erik Stokstad Jul. 17, 2020 , 8:00 AM

Dogs are renowned for their world-class noses, but a new study suggests they may have an additional—albeit hidden—sensory talent: a magnetic compass. The sense appears to allow them to use Earth’s magnetic field to calculate shortcuts in unfamiliar terrain.

The finding is a first in dogs, says Catherine Lohmann, a biologist at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, who studies “magnetoreception” and navigation in turtles. She notes that dogs’ navigational abilities have been studied much less compared with migratory animals such as birds. “It’s an insight into how [dogs] build up their picture of space,” adds Richard Holland, a biologist at Bangor University who studies bird navigation.

There were already hints that dogs—like many animals, and maybe even humans—can perceive Earth’s magnetic field. In 2013, Hynek Burda, a sensory ecologist at the Czech University of Life Sciences Prague who has worked on magnetic reception for 3 decades, and colleagues showed dogs tend to orient themselves north-south while urinating or defecating. Because this behavior is involved in marking and recognizing territory, Burda reasoned the alignment helps dogs figure out the location relative to other spots. But stationary alignment isn’t the same thing as navigation.

Read more at: https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/07/dogs-may-use-earth-s-magnetic-field-take-shortcuts

Microwave News: Kateřina Benediktová is a student of Hynek Burda at the Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague. Read more about his fascinating work: http://microwavenews.com/news-center/inordinate-love-foxes… Be sure to watch the video.

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