Association of exposure to artificial light at night with atopic diseases: A cross-sectional study in college students

Zhenwei Tang, Shenxin Li, Minxue Shen, Yi Xiao, Juan Su, Juan Tao, Xiaohui Wang, Shijun Shan, Xiaojing Kang, Bin Wu, Bin Zou, Xiang Chen, Association of exposure to artificial light at night with atopic diseases: A cross-sectional study in college students, International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, Volume 241, 2022, 113932, ISSN 1438-4639, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2022.113932.

Abstract

The impact of artificial light at night (ALAN) exposure on health has become increasingly prominent. However, little is known about the effect of ALAN exposure on atopic diseases. In this study, a cross-sectional analysis of incoming students was conducted in 5 geographically disperse universities which locate in Changsha (south), Wuhan (central), Xiamen (east), Urumchi (west), and Hohhot (north), respectively. All incoming students who consented to participate were recruited, followed by a health examination and a questionnaire survey. Prevalent atopic diseases were diagnosed by clinicians. Mean ALAN (nanoWatts/cm2/sr) during their adolescence was obtained from the remote sensing observed nighttime light data matching with their residence information, which was obtained from survey. Mixed generalized linear models (log-binomial) were used to estimate the associations, in terms of prevalence ratio (PR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 20106 participants were included in the analysis. Based on previous work, we chose factors including socioeconomic status, behavioural factors, major air pollutants, and air climatic parameters for adjustment. After full adjustment, the PR for atopic diseases was 1.35 (95% CI: 1.27–1.42; P < 0.001). The effect size of ALAN was the largest for asthma (PR = 1.80; 95% CI: 1.48–2.19; P < 0.001), followed by atopic rhinitis (PR = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.33–1.51; P < 0.001), and atopic dermatitis (PR = 1.20; 95% CI: 1.06–1.35; P = 0.003). Subgroup analyses by covariates showed consistent results. This study revealed that exposure to ALAN during adolescence may contribute to a higher risk of atopic diseases in young adulthood.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1438463922000153

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