Zimbabwe Hopes Rural Electrification Can Stop Deforestation. Here’s Why It Might Not Work

Photo: Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images
A man rides his bicycle past stumps of hardwood Mopani trees that shape part of a deforested landscape in Mhondoro Ngezi district. They were intentionally burned down because they were too big to easily chop down with axes.

04 Aug 2020

Researchers say bigger issues — poverty, corruption, inequality — can undermine rural energy programs if unaddressed.

By Maria Gallucci

In Zimbabwe, where access to the electrical grid is sparse and unreliable, millions of people still burn wood to cook food and heat their homes. The practice is partly to blame for worsening deforestation in the landlocked country. In recent years, government officials have proposed a seemingly straightforward solution: Extend the electric grid into rural villages, and reduce the use of wood for fuel.

But Ellen Fungisai Chipango, a Zimbabwe-born researcher, says that rural electrification isn’t likely to provide any quick fixes. That’s because adding poles, wires, and even off-grid solar systems will do little to alleviate the crushing poverty that leads people to cut large swaths of trees. In her field work, she found that initiatives to expand energy access in Zimbabwe often overlook the larger political and economic forces at play.

Chipango is among researchers worldwide who are closely examining long-held assumptions that electrifying rural homes can boost family incomes, help children study, reduce indoor air pollution, or protect the environment. Stakeholders including scrappy solar startups, major oil and gas companies, and the United Nations have all pledged to work toward improving energy access for one or more of those reasons. But recent studies suggest that, in order to deliver real benefits, programs must be more comprehensive.

Read more at: https://spectrum.ieee.org/energywise/energy/environment/zimbabwe-hopes-rural-electrification-stop-deforestation-it-might-not-work

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